Frequently Asked Questions about Radnor Lake

Q. How many people visit Radnor every year?
A.
Last year, Radnor Lake State Natural Area had between 850,000 and one million visitors!

Q. What is a Class II “Natural Area”?
A.
With this classification comes the most restrictive set of land management rules of any state park. Technically, protection of natural resources is the highest priority in this designation, and all activities must be conducive to nature observation and research to maintain the Class II classification.

Q. Why can’t you jog, bike, and walk dogs on trails?
A.
These activities interfere with wildlife observation and upset the delicate balance of the sensitive ecosystem maintained at Radnor Lake. You can however, jog, bike and take your dogs on the road.

Q. How many miles of trails are there at Radnor?
A.
Six miles, including easy, moderate, and strenuous hikes.

Q. Are any trails accessible to people with disabilities?
A.
Yes, there are “all-terrain” wheelchairs available in the Visitors’ Center, making the lake trail accessible for all.

Q. Why isn’t picnicking allowed at Radnor?
A.
Handouts turn wildlife into tame life!

Q. What can visitors do in addition to enjoying the trails?
A.
The experienced Radnor staff stays busy leading a variety of programs including wildflower walks, moonlight hikes, canoe floats, reptile programs, and birds of prey demonstrations. Click here for a program schedule of events.

Q. What is done for the younger generation at Radnor Lake?
A.
Children come to Radnor by the busload—from public schools, private schools, churches,  and inner-city programs. Rangers lead them through activities, gently introducing them to the natural world. The hope is that children will learn what their elders know—that the world of nature is a place to replenish the spirit. For group program information, please call the Visitor Center at 615-373-3467.

Q. What research is conducted?
A.
Research is the foundation for valuable environmental education and has been ongoing throughout Radnor Lake’s history. We have worked with Tennessee State, Middle Tennessee State University and David Lipscomb University to conduct research on the turtle, deer, and coyote and waterfowl populations. You can read more about our current research projects with MTSU here and here.

Q. How can I help protect Radnor Lake?
A.
Contribute generously to Friends of Radnor Lake and volunteer during monthly cleanup days.

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